New BSA changes that take effect Jan. 1, 2016

Scout, currently a joining badge, to become its own rank

Being a Scout is about to get a lot cooler.

Scout, previously a badge a young man received upon joining and completing a few other requirements, will become its own rank — complete with a new patch — beginning Jan. 1, 2016.

By moving from a “joining badge” to an actual rank, Scout joins Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star and Life as the ranks a young man must earn on his way to the highest rank in Scouting: Eagle Scout.

The requirements for the Scout rank are intentionally tougher than the ones for the Scout badge. Don’t expect completion of the new requirements for the Scout rank (included below) to happen overnight, particularly for boys who were not members of a Cub Scout pack. Depending on the maturity of an individual boy, it may take a few weeks for him to memorize the Scout Oath and Scout Law (Scout rank requirement 1a), as well as to learn some basic Scout skills.

But well-prepared Scouts — especially those who have recently earned the Arrow of Light — should be able to complete the Scout rank during the first few weeks after joining.

The Scout badge/rank is changing, but the age requirements to become a Boy Scout are not. A boy must be 11 years old, or have completed the fifth grade, or have earned the Arrow of Light Award and be at least 10 years old. He cannot yet have turned 18.

Let’s look at the new badge, as well as the old and new requirements.

Scout rank badge

Scout-rank-badge-old-and-new

As you can see, the new badge coloring makes more sense when seen as a part of the whole. Here’s the new set:

Boy-Scout-rank-badge-progression

 

Each rank badge design now builds on the one before it. From left to right above that’s Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life and Eagle Scout.

Previous Scout badge requirements

You’ll sometimes hear of these requirements as the “Boy Scout joining requirements.”

  1. Meet the age requirements. Be a boy who is 11 years old, or one who has completed the fifth grade or earned the Arrow of Light Award and is at least 10 years old, but is not yet 18 years old.
  2. Find a Scout troop near your home.
  3. Complete a Boy Scout application and health history signed by your parent or guardian.
  4. Repeat the Pledge of Allegiance.
  5. Demonstrate the Scout sign, salute, and handshake.
  6. Demonstrate tying the square knot (a joining knot).
  7. Understand and agree to live by the Scout Oath, Scout Law, motto, and slogan and the Outdoor Code.
  8. Describe the Scout badge.
  9. Complete the pamphlet exercises. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children From Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide.
  10. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference. Turn in your Boy Scout application and health history form signed by your parent or guardian, then participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

New Scout rank requirements

All requirements for the Scout rank must be completed as a member of a troop. If a Scout has already completed these requirements as part of the Webelos Scouting Adventure, he must simply demonstrate his knowledge or skills to his Scoutmaster or other designated leader after joining the troop.

1a. Repeat from memory the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan. In your own words, explain their meaning.

1b. Explain what Scout spirit is. Describe some ways you have shown Scout spirit by practicing the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan.

1c. Demonstrate the Boy Scout sign, salute, and handshake. Explain when they should be used.

1d. Describe the First Class Scout badge and tell what each part stands for. Explain the significance of the First Class Scout badge.

1e. Repeat from memory the Outdoor Code. In your own words, explain what the Outdoor Code means to you.

1f. Repeat from memory the Pledge of Allegiance. In your own words, explain its meaning.

2. After attending at least one Boy Scout troop meeting, do the following:

2a. Describe how the Scouts in the troop provide its leadership.

2b. Describe the four steps of Boy Scout advancement.

2c. Describe the Boy Scout ranks and how they are earned.

2d. Describe what merit badges are and how they are earned.

3a. Explain the patrol method. Describe the types of patrols that are used in your troop.

3b. Become familiar with your patrol name, emblem, flag, and yell. Explain how these items create patrol spirit.

4a. Show how to tie a square knot, two half-hitches, and a taut-line hitch. Explain how each knot is used.

4b. Show the proper care of a rope by learning how to whip and fuse the ends of different kinds of rope.

5. Demonstrate your knowledge of pocketknife safety.

6. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children From Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide and earn the Cyber Chip Award for your grade.

7. Since joining the troop and while working on Scout rank, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

Transitioning to the new requirements

Boys joining on or after Jan. 1, 2016 must use the new requirements.

Boys who have joined prior to Jan. 1, 2016 who are working on the Scout badge may continue to work on the existing requirements, but they must convert to the new requirements upon completion of the Scout badge.

 

Boy Scout service hour requirements to increase beginning next year

      http://clipart.usscouts.org/library/BSA_Insignia/BSA_Misc_Logos/bsa_logo_clipart_rwb.gif

Boy Scouts, who take an Oath “to help other people at all times,” will soon be required to do so at nearly every rank.

New requirements that take effect Jan. 1, 2016, include service hours at Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life and Eagle. (That’s every rank but the Scout rank.)

You can see the full Boy Scout service hour requirements below, but here are the basics: Scouts must complete one hour of service for Tenderfoot, two hours for Second Class and three hours for First Class. The total hours for Star and Life remain the same — six hours each. At least three of the six hours for Life must be conservation-related; this reflects an increased emphasis on environmental stewardship.

The Eagle Scout project, which has no minimum or maximum number of service hours, remains unchanged.

Beginning in 2016, a young man who advances from Scout to Eagle Scout will complete at least 18 hours of service — not including those hours spent on his Eagle Scout service project. That’s five more hours than before.

Note that service hours aren’t cumulative. In other words, the hour of service used for Tenderfoot only counts toward Tenderfoot. A Scout cannot, for example, also count that hour as one of the two he needs for Second Class.

 New Boy Scout service requirements

Tenderfoot, requirement 7b: One hour of service (up from zero)

Participate in a total of one hour of service in one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout slogan and Scout motto.

Second Class,requirement 8e: Two hours of service (up from one)

Participate in two hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Tell how your service to others relates to the Scout Oath.

First Class, requirement 9d: Three hours of service (up from zero)

Participate in three hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. The project(s) must not be the same service project(s) used for Tenderfoot requirement 7b and Second Class requirement 8e. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout Law.

Star, requirement 4: Six hours of service (same as before)

While a First Class Scout, participate in six hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster.

Life, requirement 4: Six hours of service, at least three of which are conservation-related (changed from six hours, period)

While a Star Scout, participate in six hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. At least three hours of this service must be conservation-related.

Eagle Scout: The Eagle Scout service project (same as before)

While a Life Scout, plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to any religious institution, any school, or your community. (The project must benefit an organization other than the Boy Scouts of America.)

 

New Boy Scout requirements put more emphasis on physical fitness

It’s right there in the Scout Oath: “… to keep myself physically strong … ”

Starting next year, Boy Scouts will be required to do just that if they want to advance through Scouting’s ranks.

New Boy Scout requirements that take effect on Jan. 1, 2016, put a greater emphasis on Scouts being physically active. There are new requirements at Tenderfoot, Second Class and First Class that require Scouts to do what they love to do: move around a lot. The Personal Fitness merit badge, meanwhile, remains a requirement to earn the Eagle Scout rank.

To earn Tenderfoot in 2016 and beyond, Scouts must show improvement in their time walking or running one mile. That’s up from one-quarter mile in the previous requirements. Scouts don’t need to be Roger Bannister to check this one off. They need only show improvement of any degree in their one-mile time after 30 days; “improvement” could be a single second.

Pullups, an especially tough requirement for many Scouts, even those in great physical shape, have been dropped from the requirements altogether. See more about this change below.

To earn both the Second Class and First Class ranks in 2016 and beyond, Scouts will be required to be physically active at least 30 minutes a day for five days a week. They need to do that for four weeks and keep track of their activities.

Take a look at the full requirements below. You’ll notice that most Scouts in active troops will have no trouble with this new way of keeping themselves physically strong in 2016 and beyond.

 

Tenderfoot: New fitness requirements (effective Jan. 1, 2016)

6a. Record your best in the following tests:

  • Pushups ________ (Record the number done correctly in      60 seconds.)
  • Situps or curl-ups ________ (Record the number done      correctly in 60 seconds.)
  • Back-saver sit-and-reach (Record the distance      stretched.)
  • 1-mile walk/run _____________ (Record the time.)

6b. Develop and describe a plan for improvement in each of the activities listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a. Keep track of your activity for at least 30 days.

6c. Show improvement (of any degree) in each activity listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a after practicing for 30 days.

  • Pushups ________ (Record the number done correctly in      60 seconds.)
  • Situps or curl-ups ________ (Record the number done      correctly in 60 seconds.)
  • Back-saver sit-and-reach (Record the distance      stretched.)
  • 1-mile walk/run _____________ (Record the time.)

Tenderfoot: Old fitness requirements

Show improvement in the activities listed in requirement 10a after practicing for 30 days.

  • Pushups ________
  • Pullups ________
  • Situps ________
  • Standing long jump (______ ft. ______ in.)
  • 1⁄4-mile walk/run _____________

Record your best in the following tests:

  • Pushups ________
  • Pullups ________
  • Situps ________
  • Standing long jump (______ ft. ______ in.)
  • 1⁄4-mile walk/run _____________

 

 Second Class: New fitness requirements (effective Jan. 1, 2016)

Note: Completely new requirement, so there isn’t a comparable “old” requirement.

7a. After completing Tenderfoot requirement 6c, be physically active at least 30 minutes each day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.

7b. Share your challenges and successes in completing Second Class requirement 7a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life
and develop a plan for doing so.

First Class: New fitness requirements (effective Jan. 1, 2016)

Note: Completely new requirement, so there isn’t a comparable “old” requirement.

8a. After completing Second Class requirement 7a, be physically active at least 30 minutes each day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.

8b. Share your challenges and successes in completing First Class requirement 8a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life.

 

Number of campouts required for First Class will double in 2016

 

Get ready to roll up the tent, stuff the sleeping bag and grab the flashlight. Because in 2016, Boy Scouts will do more camping than ever.

In a nod to the BSA’s century-old emphasis on preparing young people to spend time outdoors, the number of campouts required for First Class in Boy Scouting will double beginning in 2016.

This ensures that First Class Scouts will have enough camping experience to develop and improve on the outdoor skills promoted in Scouting.

Here’s the deal. Although the number of troop or patrol activities remains the same (10 total for First Class), the number of campouts required has doubled — one for Tenderfoot, two more for Second Class, and three more for First Class — for a total of six overnight campouts. That’s up from three overnight campouts.

New Boy Scout camping requirements

Note that these nights are cumulative. The key words are “since joining.” A boy needs one night for Tenderfoot, two more for Second Class and three more for First Class.

Tenderfoot, requirement 1b

Old: One night

New: One night (no change)

Spend at least one night on a patrol or troop campout. Sleep in a tent you have helped pitch.

Second Class, requirement 1a

Old: One more night, for two total since joining

New: Two more nights, for three total since joining

Since joining, participate in five separate troop/patrol activities, three of which include overnight camping. These five activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On at least two of the three campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee).

First Class, requirement 1a

Old: One more night, for three total since joining

New: Three more nights, for six total since joining

Since joining, participate in 10 separate troop/patrol activities, six of which include overnight camping. These 10 activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On at least five of the six campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee).

What counts as camping?

On at least five of the six overnight campouts used toward First Class, the Scout must “spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee).”

That means the sixth night could be spent in a cabin, for example.

What about Star, Life and Eagle?

There aren’t camping requirements for those ranks, because to become an Eagle Scout a young man must earn the Camping merit badge, which has its own camping requirements.

Requirement 9a for Camping states:

Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events. One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.

All campouts since becoming a Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may count toward this requirement, including those used to fulfill the requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class and First Class.

 

For more information on the transition please click the link below.

www.scouting.org/filestore/program_update/pdf/Transitioning_New_Requirements_2016.pdf